How can we bring space exploration and science to Earth in relatable ways to galvanize support for space exploration?

Developing multi-modal experiences to represent space exploration objects, questions, and challenges in programmable virtual and physical environments.

We are building through innovative, immersive, transdisciplinary experiences engaging the five senses in space. The pilot aims to fiducially represent space environments in virtual reality, augmented reality, and physical constructions. The team has embarked on studies towards the invention and construction of a "smell engine" to fuse olfaction into haptic, auditory and visual systems for holodeck-like experiences of space here on Earth. The team is also constructing a simulated mobile martian habitat to represent the challenges of living on Mars or other planetary environments.
Virtual Reality Smell

Project Goals

"Holodeck for Everyone"

We will create a small, spaceflight-ready suite of instruments to act as our proxy, exploring Earth. But humans are multisensory beings, so to truly experience and explore, we need to engage all five senses. Back at home, the Five Senses will combine research and education to expose and prepare more of society for humankind in space via a highly immersive and collaborative virtual environment (“Holodeck for Everyone”) that makes use of the data collected.

Bringing the space experience down to Earth

By making space understandable and relatable, we can help to engage the public to drive excitement for space exploration.

Key Accomplishments

Launching student-built payloads into space

ASU has partnered with Blue Origin and NanoRacks to launch three undergraduate student designed and constructed payloads aboard a New Shepard suborbital rocket in late 2018. These payloads include instrumentation to capture elements of the senses in space that the students will use to convey the experience here on the ground.

Life on Mars

This subset of the “holodeck” effort combines art and science to create an interactive, immersive, multisensory experience for people to feel what it might be like to live on Mars in the year 2175.

People

Robert LiKamWa
School of Arts, Media and Engineering & School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering ASU

Alireza Bahremand
School of Arts, Media and Engineering & School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering ASU

Cassie Bowman
Associate Research Professor, School of Earth and Space Exploration, ASU

Danny Jacobs
Assistant Professor, School of Earth and Space Exploration, ASU

Karin Valentine
Media Relations and Marketing Manager, School of Earth and Space Exploration, ASU

Kathryn Powell
School of Earth and Space Exploration, ASU

Brian Smith
School of Life Sciences, ASU

Rick Gerkin
School of Life Sciences, ASU

Christy Spackman
School for the Future of Innovation in Society, ASU

Victor Surovec
MKRSpace

Roy Wasson Valle
Graduate Student, Herberger Institute, ASU

 

 

Classroom Research

The two initial projects already in progress for this are the construction of a simulated mobile martian habitat, and the invention of a “smell engine” to fuse olfaction into haptic, auditory, and visual systems with virtual reality to help create holodeck­esque experiences of space here on Earth (or of Earth for astronauts on long missions).